5 Awesome Plants for Shade!

5 Awesome Plants for Shade! 🌿🌥👍 // Garden Answer

 

So the list I’m gonna give you today is by no means comprehensive, but I hope it gets you inspired and get you started. So let’s start with the first one, which is a primo. Wild rose heuchera. So heuchera is a botanical name for Coral Bells, so you might hear that plant referred to as one of those two names, but the Primo wild rose is probably the prettiest heuchera.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7IL2d9uOck

I have ever seen it’s got the most beautiful, striking rosy purple leaves with kind of this dark grey veining, and then it throws up blooms in about midsummer on burgundy stalks and the blooms are kind of a rosy pink color and they attract Butterflies and hummingbirds it’s just gorgeous.

I planted a bunch of them in my garden last year, kind of bordering a flower bed, and I enjoyed those more than almost anything else I planted in my garden last year because of its really striking purple.

Color, I think it pairs well with pretty much all other shade plants because, as you know, shade plants tend to be in shades of greens so to find something that has that bold color is just such a great contrast.

There is own 4 through 9, so in the colder climates they’re, a semi-evergreen, which means they look good through most of the winter and you may have to do a little cleanup in the spring and the warmer climates they’Re evergreen and they just look great all the time.

The second plant on my list is the autumn. Frost, hosta, and hostas are such a great shade plant. They’re, easy to grow. They’re low-maintenance the autumn frost, though the coloring is just phenomenal.

It’s, a really silvery-blue leaf with a really thick yellow margin around the whole leaf, and they just shine in a shady area, just kind of like the heuchera. I’m into the stuff that really makes a difference that really shows up in your flowerbeds.

I planted a bunch of them behind our gazebo last year and then in front of them. I had some lamium and it was just such a gorgeous contrast. I think the hostas go really well with kind of more ferny, smaller leaf plants, because of how bold the hosta is.

It’s, a zone 3 through 9, so it’s a super tough perennial, and it grows about 10 to 12 inches tall and 20 to 24 inches wide. So it’s, not a huge hosta, so it’s very easy to tuck these into a shady area.

Number three on the list is the Sprinter boxwood and if you guys have watched any of our videos, you know I’m a huge boxwood fan. I love him in a formal setting. I like him in an informal setting. I, like him in hedges in topiary, form it doesn’t matter.

I just love them. I wasn’t as familiar with the Sprinter box with a few years, but I’ve had a chance to plant them and grow them in my garden, and here’s. Why? It’s, a good choice, so it’s, an improved version of the winter gem.

You might be more familiar with that variety. The Sprinter is faster growing and it doesn’t bronze out in the winter like winter. Gem does it stays a nice glossy green? There is own five through eight and they only grow two to four feet tall and wide, which makes them an excellent choice.

If you’re wanting to have a hedge, that’s, kept a little lower, it’s a little easier to maintain, but they also look greatest fears and in their natural form, number four is maroon. Coleus and coleus is always a wonderful choice for the shade it’s more treated as an annual outside because it is a zone 10 to 11.

Not a lot of us live in our own ten to eleven, but they are very adaptable. As a houseplant as well, we’ve actually done a video where I  Ve showed pulling them out of the landscape and putting them in a pot taking them inside for the winter and wintering them over there.

But the maroon coleus is just such a beautiful, deep-colored plant and I’ve used it in containers, along with Karelas and Nimisha Xand with hydrangeas and superbills. I’ve used it in my flowerbeds last year I planted a big drift of them right in the back of a bunch of white supertunia.

So the contrast of that deep, colorful foliage and the white-colored blooms was just so pretty. It grows 24 to 36 inches tall and 18 to 36 inches wide, and I was actually very surprised at how adaptable it was in the Sun.

It got a little bit more Sun in that area, where I put it with the supertunias and it did fantastically, and this variety isn’t as quick to bloom and blooms. Aren’t as desirable on coleus. So a lot of times.

We just grow for the foliage, so I wasn’t out there having to pinch blooms off all the time which was really nice and the last one on my list is the limelight hydrangea. I could not leave hydrangeas off this list because they are such a wonderful plant, and I know that a lot of you guys most of you guys love them.

The limelight, in particular, is wonderful, because it goes with everything you can pair it with any color. You can put it in so many different locations, it kind of comes out this white, celadon, green and then ages into pinks and reds in the fall and it blooms for so long.

During the year now, hydrangeas aren’t a plant that can take deep shade. They do need some Sun in order to produce lots of blooms and to do really really well. So I & # 39. Ve got my lime lights in a spot.

That gets about six-seven hours of morning Sun and then it’s protected from the hot afternoon sun, and they do really well. If you live in a more mild climate somewhere, where it’s, not high desert, where it gets 115.

That’s. Where I live, then they can take a little bit more Sun. Throughout the day now the limelight hydrangea grows about six to eight feet tall and wide. So if you do have the kind of space to dedicate to that type of plant that size of plant.

There is one called little line that has the same beautiful color blooms, but it’s a little bit smaller at three to five feet tall and wide. So those are five plants that I think are really awesome for a shady spot in your garden and there are a lot of other shade plants that are really great.

I mean I could have made the list twenty-five or fifty plants, but I hope that this one at least just got you started and got you inspired. Thank you guys so much for watching this video and we will see you in the next one.

 

Hey guys, how’s, it going Laura with a garden dancer. Today, I want to give you five ideas for some really awesome plants to use in the shade. I know shady spots in the garden can be a little bit difficult.

So the list I’m gonna give you today is by no means comprehensive, but I hope it gets you inspired and get you started. So let’s start with the first one, which is a primo. Wild rose heuchera. So heuchera is a botanical name for Coral Bells, so you might hear that plant referred to as one of those two names, but the Primo wild rose is probably the prettiest heuchera.

I have ever seen it’s got the most beautiful, striking rosy purple leaves with kind of this dark grey veining, and then it throws up blooms in about midsummer on burgundy stalks and the blooms are kind of rosy pink color and they attract Butterflies and hummingbirds it’s just gorgeous.

I planted a bunch of them in my garden last year, kind of bordering a flower bed, and I enjoyed those more than almost anything else I planted in my garden last year because of its really striking purple.

Color, I think it pairs well with pretty much all other shade plants because, as you know, shade plants tend to be in shades of greens so to find something that has that bold color is just such a great contrast.

There is own 4 through 9, so in the colder climates, they’re, semi-evergreen, which means they look good through most of the winter and you may have to do a little cleanup in the spring and the warmer climates they’Re evergreen and they just look great all the time.

The second plant on my list is the autumn. Frost, hosta, and hostas are such a great shade plant. They’re, easy to grow. They’re low-maintenance the autumn frost, though the coloring is just phenomenal.

It’s, a really silvery-blue leaf with a really thick yellow margin around the whole leaf, and they just shine in a shady area, just kind of like the heuchera. I’m into the stuff that really makes a difference that really shows up in your flowerbeds.

I planted a bunch of them behind our gazebo last year and then in front of them. I had some lamium and it was just such a gorgeous contrast. I think the hostas go really well with kind of more ferny, more smaller leaf plants, because of how bold the hosta is.

It’s, a zone 3 through 9, so it’s a super tough perennial, and it grows about 10 to 12 inches tall and 20 to 24 inches wide. So it’s, not a huge hosta, so it’s very easy to tuck these into a shady area.

Number three on the list is the Sprinter boxwood and if you guys have watched any of our videos, you know I’m a huge boxwood fan. I love him in a formal setting. I like him in an informal setting. I, like him in hedges in topiary, forms it doesn’t matter.

I just love them. I wasn’t as familiar with the Sprinter box with a few years, but I’ve had a chance to plant them and grow them in my garden, and here’s. Why? It’s, a good choice, so it’s, an improved version of the winter gem.

You might be more familiar with that variety. The Sprinter is faster growing and it doesn’t bronze out in the winter like winter. Gem does it stays a nice glossy green? There are own five through eight and they only grow two to four feet tall and wide, which makes them an excellent choice.

If you’re wanting to have a hedge, that’s, kept a little lower, it’s a little easier to maintain, but they also look greatest fears and in their natural form, number four is maroon. Coleus and coleus are always a wonderful choice for the shade it’s more treated as an annual outside because it is a zone 10 to 11.

Not a lot of us live in our own ten to eleven, but they are very adaptable. As a houseplant as well, we’ve actually done a video where I & # 39. Ve showed pulling them out of the landscape and putting them in a pot taking them inside for the winter and wintering them over there.

But the maroon coleus is just such a beautiful, deep-colored plant and I’ve used it in containers, along with Karelas and Nimisha Xand with hydrangeas and superbills. I’ve used it in my flowerbeds last year I planted a big drift of them right in the back of a bunch of white supertunia.

So the contrast of that deep, color foliage and the white-colored blooms was just so pretty. It grows 24 to 36 inches tall and 18 to 36 inches wide, and I was actually very surprised at how adaptable it was in the Sun.

It got a little bit more Sun in that area, where I put it with the supertunias and it did fantastically, and this variety isn’t as quick to bloom and blooms. Aren’t as desirable on coleus. So a lot of times.

We just grow for the foliage, so I wasn’t out there having to pinch blooms off all the time which was really nice and the last one on my list is the limelight hydrangea. I could not leave hydrangeas off this list because they are such a wonderful plant, and I know that a lot of you guys most of you guys love them.

The limelight, in particular, is wonderful, because it goes with everything you can pair it with any color. You can put it in so many different locations, it kind of comes out this white, celadon, green and then ages into pinks and reds in the fall and it blooms for so long.

During the year now, hydrangeas aren’t a plant that can take deep shade. They do need some Sun in order to produce lots of blooms and to do really really well. So I & # 39. Ve got my lime lights in a spot.

That gets about six-seven hours of morning Sun and then it’s protected from the hot afternoon sun, and they do really well. If you live in a more mild climate somewhere, where it’s, not high desert, where it gets 115.

That’s. Where I live, then they can take a little bit more Sun. Throughout the day now the limelight hydrangea grows about six to eight feet tall and wide. So if you don & # 39, t have the kind of space to dedicate to that type of plant that size of plant.

There is one called little line that has the same beautiful color blooms, but it’s a little bit smaller at three to five feet tall and wide. So those are five plants that I think are really awesome for a shady spot in your garden and there are a lot of other shade plants that are really great.

I mean I could have made the list twenty-five or fifty plants, but I hope that this one at least just got you started and got you inspired. Thank you guys so much for watching this video and we will see you in the next one.

 

5 Ideas for Your Garden

Have you ever walked by someone’s front garden and thought – what were they thinking? The mixture and variety of plants seem to make no sense and are placed haphazardly all over the place. Although you most definitely need to choose a variety of plant types and colors for your own garden layout, how do you know when you’ve gone too far? How do you keep your garden design-focused, yet interesting at the same time?

Create a Theme

Before you even place a plant in the ground you should decide on a theme. Take a good look at your home style and your planting terrain, while also keeping in mind the climate in your area. A tropical theme may be something you greatly desire, but if you live in a very dry, arid climate, that’s going to be a tough garden to maintain.

Choose a Color Scheme

Once you decide on a general theme for your garden, you should think about color preferences. Although there is no hard and fast rule as to mixing plant colors, you will certainly want to avoid planting anything that clashes (much like if you were decorating a room). Hot climates are suitable for bold, strong colors, whereas a cool climate will tend to lean toward more muted, serene colors. Pastel colors will bring a restful feeling to your garden.

Choose Contrasting Plants

Keep texture in mind when choosing plants. Texture provides visual interest and appeal. Look at various leaf colors, shapes, and sizes. A few things to look for are plants that have soft, feathery leaves, while some are spiky. There are plants that grow small, leathery leaves while others produce large glossy leaves. And of course, there are many plants that have colored leaves – usually in the purple, deep red, or yellow ranges. It’s not just the flowers that you should be focusing on, but also the texture and variety of leaves that will also add appeal to your garden.

Pick Different Plant Types

Don’t just plant flowers. While you want to maintain the overall harmony of your garden, you should still include a variety of plant types such as small trees, evergreens, shrubs, ground covers, spring bulbs, perennials, and annuals – perhaps even some climbing vines. The spring bulbs will start your garden blooming early, while annuals will add color until your perennials begin to bloom.

Stick With Plants That Require The Same Maintenance and Care

Nothing can be more of a hassle than trying to grow healthy plants that have different plant care requirements within the same area. For example, don’t plant something that requires a lot of sun and water with other plants that are drought-tolerant and only need partial sun. You would be surprised at how many people do this without thinking. Then they either over-water the plants that require minimal water… or they don’t water often enough for thirsty plants. In either case, one type or the other will eventually wither and die.

Hopefully, the above suggestions will help those who aren’t quite sure how to go about planning their garden area and picking out suitable plants. Be sure to read the plant care labels carefully so that you can choose plants that suit each other for easy care. Take the time to look over gardening books and websites that have pictures of gardens to get a better idea of how you can coordinate your garden so that it looks wonderful too. Happy planting!

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